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Stud Poker
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Canasta
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Bridge: Contract and Auction =================
Contract and Auction
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Illustrations of Most Frequent
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Cribbage and How it is Played
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Cribbage how to Play
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Casino
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Casino
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TWENTY –ONE

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Miscellaneous Card Games
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Solitaire and Patience Games
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Parlor Games for All
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INTRODUCTION

Scarney, an all skill solitaire board game invention of the author, can be played in more than 25 different ways.  However, due to limited space, only the rules of play for Scarney Solitaire, Scarney Singles, Scarney Doubles, and High-Low Scarney appear in these pages.  Scarney Solitaire game, are based on several new skill board game principles including the newly discovered “kaleidoscopic Principle.”  An unusual scientific aspect of all three Scarney games that follow is that at each turn of play, the possible number of playable moves fluctuates.  They may increase, decrease, remain the same, or dwindle to zero.  Because of this mathematical development, plus the millions of different starting positions, Scarney can never become a game of routine mechanical skill or memory like other board games.  For detailed information and strategy of winning play for all 25 Scarney  variants.

Scarney Solitaire

“What solitaire plays the world over need badly is a great skill game.” I have said this for many years and now it seems, Scarney Solitaire has filled the bill.  It is truly the most fantastically perplexing one-person skill game in history.  Anyone can learn to play it in a few minutes, yet it holds an unflagging interest and challenge for the most constant player.
            The object of Scarney Solitaire is to try to attain the highest possible point score as shown under each of the four point rating tables that follow.  (1) Scarney Solitaire Game Point Ratings.
            Requirements

  1. One player.
  2. A Scarney game board.
  3. Sixteen numbered discs called pawns.

There are four black, four red, four yellow, and four green.  The four pawns of each color group are marked with one to four spots representing their point values.
            The start of the Game.  The solitaire player makes up his own starting position by utilizing the following rules:

  1. The solitaire player places the 16 pawns face down on the open Scarney  game board.
  2. The player by making use of both hands shuffles the face-down pawns around in a circular haphazard mixing fashion.
  3. After the face-down pawns shave been shuffled, the player places both hands around the pawns and squeezes them together causing the pawns to form two vertical rows.
  4. The player then separates the 16 face-down pawns into two groups of eight pawns each.  This is down by pushing the eight face-down pawns nearest the top edge of the board onto the top half of the board and the eight face-down pawns nearest the top edge of the board onto the top half of the board and the eight face-down pawns nearest the bottom of the board onto the bottom half of the board.
  5. The player then places the eight face-down pawns resting on the top half of the board on the eight circles forming the two top horizontal rows of the board in any color pawn arrangement desired. Next, he places the eight face-down pawns resting on the bottom half of the board on the eight circles forming the two bottom horizontal rows of the board in any color paws arrangement desired.
  6. Once the 16 face-down pawns have been properly placed on the circles of the board, they are then turned face. up on their respective circles, thus revealing their spot values. A pawn once properly placed on a circle, be it resting face down or face up, cannot be removed and placed on another circle.

The Play of the Game. After the 16 pawns have been turned face up on the circles of the board, and the player has studied the 16- pawn setup, he, for his first move, must pick up and remove from the board anyone of eight pawns that has either a one or two-spot value. The removed one- or two-spot pawn is placed aside and later credited to .the player’s score sheet . This is known as a take-off  move and only one such move is permitted during a game and it must be the first move of the game.
The player’s following moves until the completion of the game must all be jump moves. A jump move is a move that permits a player to pick up a pawn from anyone circle of the board and jump over a different colored pawn resting on an adjacent circle onto a vacant circle adjacent to the jumped pawn. The jumped pawn is then removed from the board and placed aside and later scored. To emphasize, a black colored pawn is not allowed to jump over another black colored pawn, nor can a red jump a red, nor a yellow jump a yellow, nor can a green jump a green pawn.

A jump move in Scarney Solitaire is similar to a jump or capture move in regular Checkers, except that in Scarnery Solitaire the jump move can only be made horizontally or vertically (in a sideways, or in a forward or backward direction) as indicated by the connecting red lines shown on the game board. A diagonal jump move as in regular Checkers is not permitted. A player is permitted to jump and capture only one pawn at a time. Multiple jump moves are not permitted. As a pawn is jumped, it is removed from the board and credited to the player’s game score. And so it goes, jump and capture, until the end of the game.
How to Score. A game is completed when one pawn is left on the board or the remaining pawns on the board are resting on circles of the board in such a position that a jump move is not possible. When this occurs the player adds the point values of the pawns he has removed from the board and that total becomes his game score.
To determine a player’s game score without adding the point values of his captured pawns, simply add the point value of the pawns remaining on the board at the end of the game and subtract this total from 40.. The difference is the total number of points scored by the player. Should the player score a bonus of one kind or another (see below), the point value of the bonus is added to the game score and the result is the player’s total game score.

Scarney Solitaire Game Bonuses

Single-Pawn Bonuses-Red, Green, and Yellow. When the game is ended and there is only one pawn remaining on the game board, be it red, green, or yellow, the player scores the total point value of all the pawns he removed from the game board in addition he receives a single-pawn bonus of 10 points for each spot on the remaining pawn. Example: If the lone remaining pawn is a one-spot, the single-pawn bonus is 10 points, a two-spot 20 points, a three-spot 30 points, a four-spot 40 points. To further illustrate, a lone red 3 spot is left on the game board. Player scores 37 points for game plus a Single Pawn Bonus of 30 points for a total game score of 67 points.
Black Single-Pawn Bonuses. When the poker game is ended and there is only one black pawn remaining on the board, the single-pawn bonus is valued at 20 points for each spot on the pawn. Example: If the lone black pawn is a one-spot, the single-pawn bonus is 20 points, a two-spot 40 points, a three-spot 60 points, a four-spot 80 points. To further illustrate: the lone black 3 spot is left on the game board. Player scores 37 points for the game plus a single black pawn bonus of 60 points for a total game score of 97 points.

Color and Corner Bonuses (Red, Green, and Yellow). When a game is completed and there are only two, three, or four remaining pawns on the game board all of the same color (except black) all reds, all greens, or all yellows the player scores the total point value of all the pawns he removed from the board and in addition he receives a color bonus of’ 10 points for each same-colored pawn (red, green, or yellow) remaining on the board. Example: Three green pawns whose spot values are 1, 2, and 3 are left on the board. Player scores 34 points for game plus a three-pawn color bonus of 30 points for a total game score of 64 points. If one or more of the two, three, or four remaining same-colored pawns (red, green, or yellow) are resting on corner circles of the game board, the bonus for each comer pawn is doubled to 20 points and is known as a color corner bonus. Example: Three green pawns whose spot values are 1, 2, and 3 are left on the board. Two of these three pawns are on corner circles. Game score 34 points, color corner bonus 40 points, and color bonus 10 points. Total game score: 84 points.

Black Color and Corner Bonuses. When a game is ended and there are only two, three, or four remaining pawns on the game board and they are “all black, the player receives a color bonus of 20 points for each black pawn resting on the board. Example: Three black pawns whose spot values are 1, 2, and 3 are left .on the game board. Player scores 34 points for game plus a three-pawn color bonus of 60 points for a total game score of 94 points. If, however, one or more of the remaining two, three, or four black pawns are resting on corner circles of the game board, the bonus is doubled to 40 points for each corner pawn and is known as a black corner bonus.
Number-and Corner Bonuses. When a game is completed and there are only two, three, or four remaining pawns on the game board all of the same spot values-all one- spots, all two-spots, all three-spots, or all four spots, the player receives a number bonus of 10 points for each different-colored pawn (black, red, green, or yellow). Example: Four different-colored pawns all four-spots-are left on the board. Player scores 24 points for game plus a four-pawn number bonus of 40 points for a total game score of 64 points. However, if one or more of the two, three, or four remaining same numbered pawns are resting on the corner circles of the game board, the bonus for each corner pawn is doubled to 20 points and is known as a number corner bonus.
Scarney Solitaire Game Point Ratings.

Upon completion of the game, rate your poker skill by comparing your game score with the ratings given below. The game and match ratings that follow are based on the strict adherence to the Scarney Solitaire Rules of  Play as described in the foregoing text with special emphasis on an honest shuffle and placement of the 16 pawns on the circles of the game board.
Game Score                            Rating
150 or more points                   Perfect game
125 to 149 points                     Excellent game
95 to 124 points                       Par game
75 to 94 points                         Good game
55 to 74 points                         Fair game
35 to 54 points                         Average game
30 to 34 points                         Poor game
20 to 29 points                         Try again!
19 or fewer points You need practice!

Scarney Solitaire Match Point Ratings. All the rules of Scarney Solitaire are in force except that five games constitute a match. Write down your game scores for each of the five games, then add them and compare the total with the ratings given below:

Match Score                            Rating
700 or more points                   Perfect match
625 to 699 points                     Excellent match
475 to 624 points                     Par match
375 to 474 points                     Good match
275 to 374 points                     Fair match
175 to 274 points                     Average match
150 to 174 points                     Poor match
100 to 149 points                     Try again!
99 or fewer points                    You need practice!

Scarney Solitaire Strategy. To aid the player in improving his Scarney Solitaire game as readily as possible, four sample end games and their solutions follow. The game score for each of the four end games that follow is the point difference between 40 (total spot value of all 16 pawns) and the total spot value of the pawn or pawns left on the board at the end of the game. Example: An end game is completed and five pawns totaling 17 points remain on the board game score is 23 points. Should a single, corner, color, or number bonus be scored, its bonus point value is added to the game score and the result is the player’s total game score. Some of these end games may be played correctly in more than one Way however, the total game scores are the same.
For explanation of letters and numerals in each of the four end’ games that follow For the progressive draw poker of the placement of the pawns on the circles of the board and the subsequent jump moves listed under the solution in each of the following four end games, read down the first column, then down the second column, and last, down the third column.

  • A Six-Pawn End Game

  • Total Game Score 36 Points
    The Placement of the Pawns

    Y4 on C2                     B2 on CI0                    B1 on C14
    Y3 on C5                     G3 on C11                   R4 on C15

    The Solution
    G3 jumps B2                G3 jumps Y4
    G3 jumps Y3                B1 jumps R4,
    ends game
    ````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
    Two pawns, G3 and B1, are left on the board. Total game score 36 points.

    1. A Seven-Pawn End Game

    Total Game Score 63 Points

    The Placement of the Pawns
    G3 on C1                     B3 on C8                     G4 on C12 c-
    R1 on C3                     R4 on C9
    Y4onC6                       B4onC10

    The Solution
    G4 jumps B3                G4 jumps R1                G4 jumps R4,
    R4 jumps B4                G4 jumps Y4                ends game

    Two same-colored pawns, G3 and G4, are left on the board. Game score 33 points. Color comer bonus 20 points. Color bonus 10 points. Total game score 63 points.

    1. An Eight-Pawn End Game

    Total Game Score 63 Points
    The Placement of the Pawns
    G3 on C2                     G4 on C7         B2 on C15
    Y1 on C3                     R4onC11         R1 on C16
    B4 on C6                     Y2 on C12

    The Solution

    Y2 jumps R4                G4 jumps B4                G3 jumps Y1
    R1 jumps B2                R1 jumps Y2                G4 jumps R1,
    ends game

    Two same-colored pawns, G3 and G4, are left on the board. Game score 33 points. Color comer bonus 20 points. Color bonus 10 points. Total game score 63 points.

    1. A Twelve-Pawn End Game

    Total Game Score 116 Points

    The Placement of the Pawns
    G4 on C1                     R4 on C7                     Y2 on C13
    G2 on C3                     G3 on C8                     B4 on C14
    R3 onC4                      R2onC11                     Y4onC15
    B1 on C5                     Y3 on C12                   G1 on C16

    The Solution

    Y3 jumps R2                R3 jumps G2                G4 jumps B1
    G3 jumps R4                G1 jumps Y4                Y2 jumps G4
    B1 jumps G3                Y2 jumps G1                B4 jumps Y2,
                            B4 jumps Y3                G4 jumps R3                ends game

    The lone B4 is left on the board. Game score 36 points. Black single-pawn bonus
    80 points. Total game score 116 points.

    Scarney Singles

    Scarney Singles can be played by two, three, four, or more players, each taking turns in playing a game by himself. It is played like Scarney Solitaire except that one of the contestants aids the active player in placing the 16 pawns on the circles of the game board. A game set called a match is comprised of five games for each player. The player who scores the highest number of points for the five game set is the poker winner of the match and scores the point difference between his total match score and that of each of his opponents. Should two or more players have identical high match scores one or more extra games are played by each of the high scorers until the tie is broken.

    Selecting the First Active Player

    1. Each of the players by mutual agreement seats himself at a designated place around the table where he must remain for the duration of the match, when a new seating arrangement may take place. The last player to be seated places the 16 pawns face down on the open game board and moves them about in a mixing fashion.
    2. After the mixing has been completed the player seated to the immediate left of the’ person who mixed the pawns picks anyone of the 16 face down pawns, the player seated to the first picker’s left picks anyone of the 15 face down pawns, and so it goes from player to player around the table in a clockwise fashion until each player has picked a pawn, the person who mixed the pawns picking last.
    3. The picked pawns are then turned face up revealing their spot values and the player who picked the highest numbered pawn becomes the first active player. Only the highest numbered pawn counts. In case two or more players are tied for high, the tied high players pick again until the tie is broken. From then on, each player’s active turn of play moves to the left from player to player.

    The Start of the Game

    1. The active player takes 8 pawns comprised of any two colors, say the 4 black and the 4 red pawns and the player seated to his immediate right, who shall be referred to as his “opponent,” takes the remaining 8 pawns which in this instance are the 4 green and the 4 yellow. The first move in the placing of the 16 pawns on the game board is made by the active player he takes anyone of the eight pawns he is holding and places it face up on anyone of the 16 vacant circles of the game board. Opponent then takes anyone of the eight pawns he is holding and places it face up on anyone of the 15 remaining vacant circles of the game board. Then the active online poker player takes anyone of his seven remaining pawns and places it on anyone of the 14 remaining vacant circles of the game board. Next, opponent takes anyone of his seven remaining pawns and places it on anyone of the 13 remaining circles of the game board and so it goes until the 16 pawns have been placed on the game board.
    2. In play, the active player must remove from the game board anyone of eight pawns possessing either one or two spots on its face. The removed one- or two-spot pawn is placed aside and later credited to the active player’s game score. This is known as a take-off move and only one such move is permitted per game and it must be the player’s first move of the game.
    3. The active player’s following moves until the completion of the game must all be jump moves.  A player is permitted to jump arid capture only one pawn at a time. Multiple jump moves are not permitted. As a pawn is jumped, it is removed from the board and credited to the player’s game score. And so it goes, jump and capture, until the end of the game.
    4. A game is completed when one pawn .is left on the board or the remaining pawns on the board are resting on circles on the board in such a position that a jump move is not possible. When this occurs, the active player calls “Scarney,” and such a call officially ends the game, even though there may still be one or more possible jump moves left on the board which the active player failed to take advantage of. Immediately after the active player has called “Scarney,” he adds the point values of the pawns he has removed from the game board and the total becomes his game score. To determine a player’s game score without adding up the point values of the captured pawns, simply add the point value of the pawns remaining on the board at the end of the game and subtract this total from 40. The difference is the total number of points scored by the player. Should the active player score a bonus of one kind or another, he adds the point value of the scored bonus to his game score and the result becomes his total game score. scarney gin poker Solitaire Game Bonuses  which hold good in this game, too.

     

    After the first active player’s total game score has been computed, written down and entered on the score sheet, the player seated to the previous active player’s left plays the next game as the active player, and the player to his right (previous active player) becomes the opponent and aids the active player in placing the 16 pawns on the game board. And so it goes to the left, clockwise, from player to player until each player has played five games and the match ends.
    How to Score a Scarney Singles Match.
    The match ends upon the completion of five games for each player the player with the highest score wins the match and gets a match bonus of 100 points. The winner is credited with the point difference between his total match score and that of each of the losers. Following is a sample sheet of a Scarney Singles match played by three players:

    Game

    Player A

    Player B

    Player C

    One

    32-32

                19-19

    6-6

    Two

    24-56

    77-96

    34-40

    Three

    13-69

    29-125

    27-67

    Four

    38-107

    53-178

    110-177

    Five

    21-128

    30-208

    36-213

    Player’s match

     

     

     

    Scores

    128 points

    208 points

    213 points

    Match bonus

    -

    -

    100 points

    Total match scores

    128 points

    208 points

    313 points

    In the above sample match player C, the winner, scored 313 points, B 208 points, and A 128 points. As it totals out, Player C collects 105 points from Band 185 points from A.

    Scarney Doubles

    A Scarney Doubles match consists of three or , more games and terminates at the end of any game in which a total score of 100 points or more is attained by one or both players. In either case the player with the higher score wins the match and scores the point difference between his total match score and that of his opponent. Should both players have identical match scores, an extra game or games is played until the tie is broken. It is played as Scarney Singles except that there are two players, each playing against the other simultaneously.
    The Play. After the 16 pawns have been placed on the circles ofthe board, beginning with the nonstarter (player who placed the last, sixteenth, pawn on the game board), the turn ofplay passes alternately from player to player until the completion ofthe game.

    A description ofthe scarney gin doubles game moves and method ofplay follows:

    1. The nonstarter, for his first move, must pick up and remove from the board anyone ofeight pawns that has either a one- or two- spot value. The removed pawn is placed aside and later credited to the nonstarter’s game score. This is a compulsory first move for each player and is known as a take-off move.
    2. The nonstarter’s opponent then picks up and removes from the board any of the seven remaining pawns that has either a one-or two- spot value. The take-off pawn is placed aside and later credited to the nonstarter’s game score.
    3. Next, beginning with the nonstarter and continuing alternately, each player’s following move or moves must all be jump moves. But, a player is not permitted to jump a pawn with the same-colored pawn. Examples: A black pawn cannot jump over another black pawn, nor can a red jump a red, a yellow jump a yellow, nor a green jump a green.
    4. A player at his turn of play is permitted to jump and capture only one pawn. As a

    pawn is jumped, it is removed from the board and credited to the player’s score, and that ends his turn of play poker . And so goes the jump move from player to player until the end ofthe game.
    How to Score a Scarney Doubles Game. A game is ended when one pawn is left on the game board, or the remaining pawns on the board are resting on circles ofthe board in such a position that a jump move is not possible. When such a situation is reached, the player who made the last jump move calls “Scarney” and officially ends the game. He then sweeps the remaining pawn or pawns from the board and adds the point values ofthese pawns from the board to those he has already removed from the board. Upon completion ofthe game each player adds the point values ofthe pawns in his possession and that total becomes his game score. At the end ofeach game the score for each player is computed, written down, and added to any score made earlier in the match.

    How to Score a Scarney Doubles Match. The match terminates at the end of any game in which a total of 100 or more points is scored by one or both players. The player with the higher score wins the match and receives a 100-point match bonus plus the point difference between both match scores.

     

    Game

    Player 1

    Player 2

    One

    11-11

    29-29

    Two

    8-19

    32-61

    Three

    27-46

    13-74

    Four

    20-66

    22-66

    Five

    15-81

    25-121

    Player’s match scores

    81 points

    121 points

    Match bonus

    -

    100 points

    Total match scores

    81 points

    221 points

    Minus player A’s score

    -

    81 points

    Player B wins the match by

     

    140 points

    At the end of the fifth game Player B’s score totaled 121 points. Since 100 points or more ends the match, B is the winner. In addition B gets a 100 point bonus for winning the match, giving him a match total of 221 points. Player B gets credit for the 140 points difference between his total match score of 221 points and A’s 81. You will note that each player’s individual game score is written down in the left hand column and the cumulative score in the right hand column. This makes it known to each player at all times how many points each needs to win the match.
    Scarney Doubles Strategy. Following are a few essential bits of poker strategy that if put to use will save the beginner many an early loss and also help him better his Scarney Doubles game. For instance, the beginner, when placing his eight pawns on the circles of the board, should at all times place at least one possible take-off pawn (a one- or two-spot) on one of the four center circles of the board to be utilized as his take-off move. However, before making the play the beginner should try to make sure that after his move there will remain on the board at least one possible jump move which can land onto the circle vacated by his take-off move.
    If the beginner is the nonstarter of the game and he makes his take-off move from the circle situated on the board’s edge, he must try to leave two possible jump moves which will land onto the circle vacated by his take-off move-while at the same time taking into consideration that his opponent mayor may not make his take-off move from a circle adjacent to the circle which the beginner’s take-off move vacated.

    The beginner’s best overall game strategy is to try to capture as many high-valued pawns as possible while trying at the same time to go Scarney as quickly as possible. To aid the beginner in this direction, it is suggested that at each turn of play and before making his move, he should try to analyze the number of possible jump moves left on the board. This is done by mentally counting the number of possible jump moves that will remain on the board should he make a certain jump move. Should the total number of possible jump moves be an odd number (1, 3, 5), pass the move by and try to find one that totals an even number (2, 4, 6) of possible jump moves. If you cannot find such a move, your next best bet is to try to play into as complicated a position as possible.
    Scarney Doubles requires deep concentration and sometimes one might inadvertently overlook many simple winning plays. Therefore, it is suggested that even though a player believes he is in a losing position, there is no reason for him to be certain his opponent recognizes it also. In face of this fact, one should not discuss or point out winning or losing positions on the Scarney board while a game is in progress. Very often a losing position can be maneuvered into a winning one on the following play and the player can bring victory out of defeat.

    High-Low Scarney

    High-Low Scarney, the world’s greatest mathematical game of skill, another invention of the author, is played unlike any other game. Anyone can learn to play the game in a few minutes; yet a mathematical wizard will have more success mastering the game of chess poker . High-Low Scarney is truly history’s greatest mathematical skill game.
    A High-Low Scarney match consists of a series of games and terminates at the end of any game in which a total score of 100 points or more is attained by one player.  The object of the game is twofold: (1) To try to win the game by removing the 15th pawn from the game board and leave either a three- or four-spot pawn remaining on the board; or (2) To try to force your opponent to lose the game by compelling him to remove the 15th pawn from the board and leave either a one- or two-spot pawn remaining on the board.

    Requirements

    1. Two players, each playing against the other simultaneously.
    2. A Scarney Game Board.
    3. Sixteen numbered discs called “pawns.” There are four black, four red, four yellow and four green. The four pawns ofeach color group are marked with one to four spots representing point values.

    The Start of the Game. To determine the selection ofthe pawns and to choose the player who makes the first move, either player, by mutual consent, places two pawns ofthe same color face down on the table and moves them around in a mixing fashion. His opponent picks one and he the other.

    The player who picked the high numbered pawn takes eight pawns of two colors-say, four blacks and four reds, four greens and four yellows, or four blacks and four greens. His opponent takes the remaining eight pawns. The player who picked the higher- numbered pawn plays first and is referred to as the starter. Thereafter, the loser ofthe previous game becomes the starter and has the right to select the first eight pawns.
    The First Play of the Game. The starter takes anyone ofthe eight pawns he is holding and places it face up on anyone ofthe 16 vacant circles ofthe game board. His opponent then takes anyone of the eight pawns he is holding and places it face up on anyone ofthe 15 remaining vacant circles of the game board.
    The above method ofplacing the remaining pawns held by the players continues alternately until all 16 pawns have been placed on the game board. The method ofplacing the pawns on the game board is part of the strategy of High-Low.
    The High-Low Scarney Game Moves. Each of the two players, beginning with the starter, takes turns in removing either one, two, or three same-colored pawns from the board. A detailed description of each ofthese three high-low-poker moves follows:

    1. A Single-Pawn Move. The player may remove from the board anyone pawn resting on anyone ofthe 16 circles ofthe game board.
    2. A Two-Pawn Move. The player may remove from the board any two same-colored pawns from any vertical or horizontal row provided that the two pawns are not separated from one another by one or two different-colored pawns. An unoccupied circle or circles of the same row that separate the two same-colored pawns from one another does not prevent the removal of the pawns.
    3. A Three-Pawn Move. The player may remove from the board any three same- colored pawns from any vertical or horizontal row, provided that the pawns are not separated from one another by a different-colored pawn. An unoccupied circle of the same row that separates three same-colored pawns does not prevent their removal from the board.

    Note: When three or four same-colored pawns are resting on circles of a row, the player, when using a two-pawn move, has the privilege of removing any two pawns from the group of three or four same-colored pawns. They do not have to be resting on adjacent circles of the board. The same rule applies when using a three-pawn move when four same-colored pawns are situated in a row.

    The Final Play of the Game. The players move alternately by using either a one, two, or three-pawn move until only one pawn remains on the game board, thus ending the game. The last pawn (sixteenth) always remains on the board, and it is this pawn that determines the winner and loser of the game. If the player who made the last move of game leaves a three- or four-spot pawn on the game board, he calls “Scarney” and is declared the winner. If the player leaves a one- or two-spot on the game board, his opponent calls “Scarney” and is declared the winner of the game.
    How to Score a High-Low Scarney Game

    1. Only the winner of the game receives point credits for the pawns he removed from the board. The pawns removed from the board by the loser of the game are disregarded. They are lost and hence are valueless.
    2. If the player who made the last move of the game (remover of the fifteenth pawn) leaves either a three- or four-spot pawn remaining on the board, he calls “Scarney” and is declared the winner of the game and is credited with the total number values of the pawns he removed from the board, and that total becomes his game score. However, if the last remaining three- or four-spot pawn is black, the winner’s game score is doubled. Example: If the winner removed nine pawns from the board and the sum of their number values is 21, the winner’s game score is 21 points. If the last remaining three- or four- spot pawn is black, the winner simply doubles the 21 points and gets a total game score of 42 points.
    3. If the player who made the last move of the card game (remover of the fifteenth pawn) leaves either a one- or two-spot pawn remaining on the board, he loses the game. His opponent calls “Scarney” and is declared the winner of the game and is credited with the total number values of the pawns he removed from the board and that total becomes his game score. However, if the last remaining one- or two-spot pawn is black, the winner’s game score is doubled. Example: If the winner removed seven pawns from the board and the sum of their number values is 16, the winner’s game score is 16 points. If the last remaining one- or two-spot pawn is black, the winner simply doubles the 16 points and gets a total game score of 32 points.
    4. The last pawn (sixteenth), which determines the winner or loser of the game, remains on the game board and does not enter into the scoring.

    How to Score a High-Low Scarney Match

    1. The match terminates at the end of any game in which a total of 100 or more points is scored by either player.
    2. At the completion of each game the winner enters his score on the sheet.
    3. At the end of the match an extra 20 points known as a game bonus is added to each player’s score for each game won.
    4. Winner of the match gets a match bonus of 100 points for winning.
    5. Should a player score 100 points or more before his opponent scores any points at all, the winner gets a 100 point shutout bonus.
    6. Winner of the match scores the point difference between his total match score and that of his opponent.

     

    Following is a sample score sheet of a High- Low Scarney Match. You will note that each player’s individual game score is written down in the left hand column and the cumulative score in the right.

    A                      B
    -                       21-21
    22-22               -
    -                       44-65
    -                       26-91
    -                       23-114
    Players’ Match Scores 22 points          114 points
    Game Bonuses                         20 points          80 points
    Match Bonus                            -                       100 points
    Total Match Scores                  42 points          294 points
    Minus A’s Match Score                                    -42 points
    B wins the match by                                          252 points

    In the above sample’ match B won five games scoring a total of 114 points. A won one totaling 22 points. B’s 114 points put him over the 100 point match mark which ends the match and makes him the winner. B gets four game bonuses, a total of 80 points at 20 points each. A gets one 20 point game bonus. B also receives the 100 points match bonus for winning the match. B’s total match score is 294, A’s 42. B’s point winning for the match are the point difference in scores or 252 points.
    High-Low Scarney Strategy. Most beginners tend to take pawns off the game board blindly without giving any thought to their moves until but five or six pawns remain on the game board. Then they stop and begin to study the end-game setup of these last few pawns. But as the player gains proficiency he will learn that considerable strategy can be employed even with the placing of the pawns on the game board.
    Some players favor placing the same- colored three- and four-spot pawns on adjacent circles of the board. Others do the same with one- and two-spot pawns, and others favor placing as many same colored pawns on the same row as their opponent will permit by his strategy. And, some prefer a mixture of different-colored pawns on adjacent circles. How important this strategy becomes to the winning or losing of the game depends entirely upon the player’s own ability. High- Low experts start planning their strategy with the placing of the first pawn on the board. Undoubtedly, this demonstration of skill is too far advanced for the average High-Low player. However, there are a few essential bits of strategy that all grades of High-Low players should be familiar with, and they are as follows:

    It is assumed the player has learned the workings of a number of end-game traps (there are seven end-game traps described in the following pages).
    When the removal of the pawns takes place, the player should, if possible, try to remove all the other pawns and leave a known winning end-game trap for himself. Or, he may spot a possible winning trap placed on the board by his opponent. Or, he may add some pawns to such a partial setup made by his opponent and form a possible winning end-game trap. Under such conditions the strategy when removing the pawns would be to try to leave this setup as an end- game trap on the board. When the removal of the pawns takes place, the player should, if possible, try to remove all the other pawns and leave a known winning end-game trap for ‘himself.
    Usually the opponent will break up this end-game trap possibility by removing pawns from it. For that reason a player should try to form several different end-game traps on the board during the placing of the pawns. Then should one trap be broken up by the opponent while removing pawns from the board, the player has the possibility of having another end-game trap remain intact. Naturally, if all the traps are broken up by the opponent, the player must then try to play into a winning end-game trap with the remaining pawns. Therefore, the player must be on the lookout for every possible setup that can be formed into a winning end-game trap during all phases of the game.
    For obvious reasons the point scoring result for the end-game traps that follow have been omitted. Some of these traps may be played correctly in more than one way; the result and the total point value of pawns removed from the board by the winner should be the same. As you skarney played these traps on your game board, give the board a quarter turn and study them from all angles so they will be recognizable should they occur during play. For explanation of letters and numerals that follow.

    img1


    The numbered Scarney game board.  But remember in actual play no Scarney game boards are numbered.

     

    Seven High-Low End-Game Traps

    1. A Four-Pawn End-Game Trap. Place R3 on C2, R4 on C4, 04 on C5, and G2 on C9. Player A moves first and B loses the game. Solution: Player A removes G4, B removes R3 and R4, and loses the game by leaving 02 on the board.
    2. A Five-Pawn End-Game Trap. Place BI on C2, R3 on C10, G4 on C5, G2 on C7, and , G3 on C8. Player A moves first and wins the game. Solution: Player A removes G4 and G2, B removes G3, A removes BI, and wins the game by leaving R3 on the board.
    3. A Six-Pawn End-Game Trap. Place B4 on C2, R2 on C4, R3 on C5, R4 on C8, B3 on C10, and R1 on C16. Player A moves first and wins the game. Solution: Player A removes R2 and R1, B removes B4 and B3, A removes R4, and wins the game by leaving R3 on the board.
    4. A Seven-Pawn End-Game Trap.  Place B1 on C5, Y4 on C7, B2 on C8, Y3 on C11, R2 on C12, G2 on C14, and R1 on C16.  Player A moves first and B loses the game.  Solution: Player A removes Y4 and Y3, B removes B1 and B2, A removes R2, B removes G2, and loses the game by leaving R1 on the board.
    5. An Eight-Pawn End Game Trap.  Place R1 on C5, R4 on C6, R3 on C7 R2 on C8, G2 on C13, G3 on C14, G1 on C15, and G4 on C16.  Player A moves first and wins the game.  Solution: Player A removes G2, G1, and G4, B removes R4, R3, and R2, A removes R1, and wins the game by leaving G3 on the board.
    6. A  Nine-Pawn End-Game Trap.  Place G3 on C1, R1 on C3, G4, on C5, R3 on C6, R4 on C7, Y4 on C8, R2 on C11, Y3 on C12, and B4 on C14.  Player A moves first and wins the game.  Solution: Player A removes R1, R4 and R2, B removes Y4 and Y3, A removes G4, B removes B4, A removes G3, and wins the game by leaving R3 on the board.
    7. A Ten-Pawn End-Game Trap.  Place G2 on C1, G1 on C2, R4 on C3, G3 on C5, B3 on C6, Y3 on C7, G4 on C9, R2 on C10, Y4 on C12, and B4 on C16, Player A moves first and wins the game.  Solution: Player A removes G2, G3, and G4 and B removes B4, A removes R4, A removes G1, and wins the game by leaving Y3 on the board.

    The Numbered Scarney Game Board.  To aid the reader to understand more readily the structure and formation on the game board of the pawn setups which are given in this book, the lettered and numbered illustrations of poker game board shown here is necessary.  You will note that on each of the 16 circles of the illustrated game board, the letter C  and numerals from 1 to 16 appear, representing an identical circle on your game board.  The letter B represents a black pawn, R a red pawn, Y a yellow pawn, and G a green pawn Example:  B4 represents the Black 4-spot pawn, R3 represents the red pawn numbered 3.  Y2 represents the yellow pawn numbered 2.  G1 represents the green pawn numbered 1.  And so on.

     

    =================
    AMERICAN WHIST =================

    AMERICAN WHIST
    BID WHIST
    VINT
    BOSTON
    =================
    Pinochle Many Variations
    =================

    Pinochle Many Variations
    Two-Handed Pinochle
    Two-Handed Doubling Redoubling
    Auction pinochle

    Strategy at Auction
    CAD found
    Partnership Auction
    Auction pinochle without wido Individual play
    Partnership Aeroplane Pinochle
    Radio Partnership Pinochle

    =================
    Other Members of the Bezique Family

    =================

    The Bezique Family
    Rubicon bezique
    Two-handed sixty-six
    Two-handed piquet
    Imperial
    Jass
    Boo-Ray or BOURÉ

    =================
    The Big Euchre Family
    =================

    The big euchre family
    Strategy of euchre
    Auction euchre
    Table of scoring points
    Napoleon
    Spoil five
    Double hasenpfeffer
    Ecarte
    Three-card loo
    Schafkopf

    =================
    The Heart Group
    =================

    Heart Group
    Spot Hearts
    Black Widow Hearts

    =================
    The All-Fours Group
    =================

    All-Fours Group
    Shasta Sam
    Auction Pitch Joker
    Razzle-Dazzle

    =================
    Banking Card Games
    =================

    Banking Card Games
    Black Jack, Casino Style
    Black Jack Strategy
    Pontoon
    CHEMIN DE FER
    CHEMIN DE PER must play
    Baccarat Banque
    Faro or farobank
    ZIGINETTE
    CHINESE FAN-TAN
    Banker and broker
    Red Dogs


    Card craps
    Lottery
    TRENTE ET QUARANTE

    =================
    The Stops Games
    =================

    Stops Game
    SNIP-SNAP-;SNOREM
    ENFLE
    =================
    Skarney® and How It Is Played
    =================

    Skarney® and How It Is Played
    Alternate Skarney
    Skarney Singles
    SKARNEY GIN ®
    Skarney Gin Doubles

    =================
    Cheating at Card Games
    =================

    Cheating at Card Games
    Professional Card Cheats
    Nullifying the Cut
    The Peek
    How to Shuffle Cards

    =================
    Dice and their Many Games
    =================

    Dice and their Many Games
    The Casino Game: Bank Craps
    THE CASINO’S LPERCENTAGE OF BANK CRAPS BETS
    SCARNE’S RULES FOR OTHER DICE GAMES
    English Hazard
    Hooligan
    General
    Double Cameroon
    Partnership Straight scarney Dice
    Scarney Duplicate Jackpots
    Scarney Chemin de Fer

    ===================
    Games Requiring Special Equipment
    ===================

    Backgammon
    Parcheesi
    Hasami Shogi
    Scarney
    Follow The Arrow
    Roulette

    ===================
    Lottery and Guessing Games
    ===================

    Lottery guessing game
    Tossing Game
    Race Horse Keno
    Moko
    The Match Game

    ===================
    Glossary of Game Terms
    ===================

    glossary
    glossary1
    glossary2
    glossary3

     

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