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Introduction
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Games you Can Play
General Rules
Imperfect Deck
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Draw Poker
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Draw Poker
General Rules of Poker
Stander Hand Rank of Poker
Basic Draw Poker Rule
Draw Poker Variation
Low and High-Low Variation
Spit Card Variants Poker
Miscellaneous Draw Poker Variants

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Stud Poker
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Stud Poker
Five Card Stud Variation
Miscellaneous Stud Poker Variants
General Poker strategy
Possible Poker Hands
Paring your Hole Card

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Rummy Games
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Rummy Games
Six Seven Card Straight
PIF-PAF
Six Seven Card Knock Rummy
Coon Can
Five Hundred Rummy
Continental Rummy
Fortune Rummy
Kalooki (CALOOCHI)
PAN

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Gin Rummy =================

Gin Rummy
Standard Hollywood Gin Rummy
Jersey Gin

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Canasta
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Canasta
Variation of Canasta
Typical Four-Handed Score Sheet

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Bridge: Contract and Auction =================
Contract and Auction
Contract Bridge Scoring Table
Bridge Poker
Minimum Biddable Suits
CONVENTIONAL LEADS
CHANCES OF VARIOUS SUIT
The Laws of Progressive Contract Bridge
The Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge
Auction bridge

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Cribbage and How it is Played
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Cribbage how to Play
Strategy at Cribbage

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Casino
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Casino
Strategy at Casino

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Children and Family Card Games
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Family Card Games
Old Maid
Animals or menagerie
TWENTY –ONE

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Miscellaneous Card Games
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Miscellaneous Card Games
Briscola
Primiera
Scotch whist
Lift smoke
Preference
Grand
Crazy eights

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Solitaire and Patience Games =================

Solitaire and Patience Games
Single-deck solitaire
Decade
Auld Lang Syne
Klondike
Four Seasons
Beleaguered Castle
Trefoil
Poker Solitaire
Two-deck solitaire
Tournament
Multiple solitaires

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Chess, Checkers, and Teeko
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Chess
Checkers
Teeko
Standard Teeko Strategy
Start Teeko Game
Standard Checkers Law

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Parlor Games for All
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Parlor Games
Twenty Questions

CONVENTIONAL LEADS

Holding in Suit

Lead at Suit Bids

Lead at No-Trump

A-K-Q-alone or with others

K, then Q

K, then Q

A-K-J—x-x-x-x

K, then A

A* then K

A-K-J—x-x or A-K-x-x-(-x)

K, then A

Fourth best

A-Q-J-x-x-

A

Q

A-Q-10-9

A

10

A-Q-x-x (-x)

A

Fourth best

A-J-10-x

A

J

A-10-9-x

A

10

A-x-x-x(-x)

A

Fourth best

A-K-x

A

K

A-K-alone

A

K

K-Q-J alone or with others

K, then J

K, then Q

K-Q-10 alone or with others

K

K

K-Q-x-x-(-x-x)

K

Fourth best

K-Q alone

K

K

K-J-10-alone or with others

J

J

K-10-9-x

10

10

Q-J-10-or Q-J-9 alone or with others

Q

Q

Q-J-x or Q-J

Q

Q

Q-J-8-x (four or more)

Q

Fourth best

Q-10-9 alone or with others

10

10

J-10-9 or J-10-8 alone or with others

J

J

J-10-x- or J-10

J

J

J-10-x-x or more

J

Fourth best

10-9-8 or 10-9-7 alone or with others

10

10

10-9-x-x-x (-x)

10

Fourth best

K-J-x-x (-x-x)

Fourth best

Fourth best

Any other four-card or longer suit not listed above

Fourth best

Fourth best

LEADS IN PARTNER’S BID SUIT

Holding in Suit

Lead at Suit Bids

Lead at No-Trump

A-x, K-x, Q-x, J-x, 10-x or any other doubleton

High card

High card

J-10-x or x-x-x

Highest

Highest

A-J-x or A-x-x

Ace

Lowest

K-J-x, K-x-x, Q-10-x, Q-x-x, J-x-x

Lowest

Lowest

Q-J-x(-x)

Q

Q

A-x-x-x or better

A

Fourth best

A-K-x (-x) or K-Q-x (-x)

K

K

Any other four or more cards

Fourth best

Fourth best

 

More Information on Making Leads.  As a general gambling guide to making leads, the following principles should be observed by the defenders.  They are especially helpful when a defender has no good suit of his own to play  and there is no indication from partner what his best suit is.

  1. Lead through dummy’s strong suit other than trump.  “Leading through” means that dummy is the second hand to play to the trick and declarer last.  This suit is often indicated by declarer’s and dummy’s bidding.  After the dummy goes down, this kind of lead should not be made if it helps  declarer establish long suit that will give him the contract before the setting tricks  have been taken.
  2. Lead up to the weak suit in dummy.  This lead is made by the defender at dummy’s left, and it means that dummy is the last hand to play to the trick and declarer is the second hand.
  3. Do not lead up to a tenace; that is, do not make lead  that will permit the dummy or declarer’s hand  to play last to a trick when they hold a tenace in the led suit.

The Play after the Opening Lead.

  1. The Rule of Eleven.  When a defender makes an opening lead which is probably his fourth highest card in that suit, his partner can get useful information by applying the “rule of eleven.”  Here is the way it works: Subtract the denomination of the led card from 11. The resulting number will tell how many cards higher in denomination than the lead are outside of the leader’s hand. Since the cards in dummy and in his own hand can be counted, leader’s partner knows how many higher cards remain in declarer’s hand.
  2. Third-Hand High. A defender is generally required to play his highest card on the lead of a low card by partner. This is known as “third-hand high,” as the player is the third hand to play to the trick. The principle is that a still higher card poker cheats must be played from declarer’s hand, or dummy’s as the case may be. This play helps establish cards in partner’s hand, since it is assumed he led from his best suit. However, if leader’s partner holds a sequence of high cards, he plays the lowest card of the sequence on the lead of his partner’s low card. Example: If a player holds king-queen-jack or queen-jack-ten or jack- ten-nine, he plays the lowest card of the three. This gives partner valuable information, as declarer in order to take the trick must playa card higher than the top card of the sequence.

Another exception to third-hand high would be as in the following example: Defender A leads a six. Dummy shows queen- ten-nine of that suit. Defender B holds king- jack-x. If dummy plays the nine or ten, B should play the jack, not the king, since the jack in this case is as good as the king and it will take an ace to beat it.

  1. Second-Hand Low. When a low card is led from dummy or declarer’s hand and defender is the second one to play to the trick, he should not, as a rule, play his highest card. He plays a low card, because declarer generally intends playing a high card anyway, since he has led the suit. There are, of course, exceptions, such as when a defender. As second hand holds a winning card which will set the contract; or when he wants to have the lead for some reason and the playing of a winning card will obtain it for him right away.
  2. Come-on Signal. When a defender wishes to encourage his partner to continue a suit, he plays high then low, that is, a lower card to the second trick in that suit than he played to the first trick. This is known as a “come-on,” “high-low,” or “echo.” In general, the play of a seven ‘or better on partner’s lead’s of a card which promises to take a trick is a signal that the suit should be continued. The high-low may be also used in leading to indicate a doubleton.
  3. Discouraging Signal. When a player can wishes to discourage his partner from continuing a suit, he should play the lowest card he has. This is a signal that partner should consider shifting to another suit unless he has the very good reason to continue in the suit led.
  4. Returning a Lead. When a player’s partner has led a suit, the player should try to that lead that suit again at his earliest opportunity, returning his highest card in it, unless there is be a very clear indication that partner was leading from a weak suit.
Declarer’s Play

Planning the Play. Declarer’s first step Nest after the opening lead has been made and the dummy hand laid down is to take stock of the olds two poker handed. He should figure out a basic line of attack which promises to give him the needed tricks for his contract. Any bids that ma- the opponents have made may provide clues to the location of key defensive cards or the of distribution of adverse strength.
As the game progresses, he may be forced high to modify his plan, but it is better to give some thought to the matter at the beginning than to play along haphazardly, hoping that enough tricks will be made somehow. Experienced players usually plan alternate lines of play that they can switch to if the basic one does not prove feasible.
Playing at a Trump Declaration. In playing rd is a contract where there is a trump suit, it is generally best to draw opponent’s trumps at the first opportunity. This should be done even though the opponents will take a trick or tricks in trump in the process. Trumps are way, drawn to protect declarer’s good non-trump suits and prevent them from being trumped- ruffed-by opponents.
There are occasions, however, when the drawing of opponent’s trumps should be post-pond or avoided entirely. This is usually the right case when declarer is short-suited in non-trump suits in one hand or the other, or in both, and wishes to make some or all pieces of trump individually.

 

 

The play of a finesse.

 

Playing at a No-Trump Declaration. In playing a no-trump contract, declarer should first work out a simple problem in arithmetic.  He should count the tricks he definitely is sure of, then subtract them from the number he needs for the contract.  He should then plan how he Canasta make the needed tricks.  These are usually to be made in the suits in which his hand and dummy’s are longest.  This  generally involves surrendering a trick or two in that suit to the opponents.  But it does not matter since declarer Canasta usually afford to lose a certain number of tricks in the hand and still make his contract.  Giving up a trick  or tricks in a suit so that the remainder of the cards will be winners is known as “establishing a suit.”
            Experienced players when holding no high card but the ace of a strong suit led by opponents will often refuse to take the trick until the suit is led a second or third time.  This is done in the hope of breaking the connection between the opponent’s poker hands in that suit so that one player will have none of the suit to play when he is next in the lead.  This type of play is known as “a holdup.”
            The Finesse.  The finesse is an attempt to establish a card as a winner while some higher card held by  opponents  in that suit has not yet been played.  The combination of cards where an extra trick or tricks may be won by means of a finesse is known as a tenace.  Thus, ace-queen is a tenace, and other illustrations will be found in the following examples.  In each of the following cases, the finesse described is the one generally used.  A good way of fixing  these finesses in mind is actually to make the plays indicated with cards.

    1. Lead a small card from South and assuming that West plays a low card, his normal play, put on the queen from North.  If West has the king of the suit, the queen  will win to provide another trick besides the ace.
    2. Lead the ace from South  fro the first trick.  For the second trick, lead a small card from South toward North.  If West has the king, the queen will be established as a trick to be taken later.  Do not lead  the queen from North for the first trick since that play will produce only one trick out of the two honors regardless  of which opponent holds the kind.
    3. Lead the queen from South.  If West does not play the king, put on the small card from North.  This is known as letting the queen ride.  The lead of the queen in this situation offers a chance to win two tricks if West had the king.
    4. The same principles as C applies.
    5. Lead a small card from North and play the jack from South to the first trick.  The next time, lead a small card from North again and play the ten for a second finesse.  If West and East each have one of the two missing honors, or if East has both of them, this line of play is sure to win two tricks.
    6. The same principle as E applies.


Examples of “double” finesses.

 

Lead  the jack to the first trick and later finesse again by playing a small card from South and putting on the ten from North.
            These plays in E and F are known as double finesses.
            Unblocking.  When a suit is longer in one hand than in the other, case should be taken  to play the cards in such a way that the player does not prevent himself  from continuing to lead that suit without interruption.
            In the following examples, South is declarer and North  is dummy hand.

 

An example of unblocking

 

            If declarer leads his king to trick one and his queen to trick two, he will find himself in the South hand after playing trick three.  This will prevent him from continuing the suit without getting back into the North hand in some other way.
            But if he first leads his ace from South and then continues with a small card from South on the next trick, he will find himself able to play the suit uninterruptedly. The principle to remember is that the high card or cards should first be how poker played from the shorter holding.
            The End Play.  This is a stratagem by which declarer gives opponents a trick, which they must win in any case, at a time when it will be to declarer’s advantage to have the opponents in the lead.  In the following example seven tricks have already been played, leaving this situation:

            North, the declarer, must win five out of the remaining six tricks to fulfill his contract spades are trump.  His first lead is the ace of trumps from dummy, exhausting West of trump.  He then leads the four of clubs, which he trumps with one of the two remaining trumps in North.  This play strips South of clubs.
            North’s next play is the ten of hearts, giving up a trick that he would have to lose in any case.  This play is known as the throw-in.  West is now in the lead.  He must lead a club or a diamond.  If he leads a club, declarer Canasta trump in his own hand and discard the losing jack of diamonds from dummy.  But if West  chooses to lead a diamond instead of the club, declarer will win two tricks in diamonds.  Thus, two apparent losers have been reduced to one.
            The Squeeze.   This is a stratagem buy which declarer squeezes an opponent out of an apparent winner by giving him a choice of plays.  In the following example, after ten tricks have been played, this is the situation:
            South, the declarer, must win all three tricks, to fulfill his contract.  Hearts are trump.  South’s first lead is the ten of trumps.  East is in trouble no matter which card he discards to the lead.  If he discards one of the spades,  South’s next lead is the four of spades and he wins both spades in North.  On the other hand, if East discards the nine of diamonds  on the lead of the ten of hearts, that makes South’s eight of diamonds a good card, on which he will discard the losing three of spades.

Other Notes on General Play

             Splitting Honors.  When holding two touching honors, such as king-queen or queen-jack, it is generally wise to play  one of them on the lead of a low card by opponent.  This is known as splitting honors.    It forces opponent  to play a higher honor, thus promoting the other honor in the hand to a winner or near winner.
             Covering an Honor with an Honor.  When an opponent leads an honor, it is generally wise for a player to put a higher honor on it if he has one.  This is known as covering an honor with an honor.  It forces declarer to play a still higher honor if he wishes to win the trick, that is, two honors for one.  This play may also promote a lesser honor or an intermediate card in partner’s hand.
            Trump and Discard.  When a  play known that both opponents are void of the same suit not lead that suit since it provides an opportunity for discarding a losing card in one hand and trumping in the other.  This is also known as a stuff and ruff. 

Examples of the end play (A) and the squeeze (B)

Correct Bridge Odds

The reason Bridge surpasses most other card games in strategy is due to the fact that in card games, all fifty-two cards are first dealt out, thirteen  to each of four players to start the game.  Therefore, the number of different card combinations that face each player is virtually infinite, to be  specific the astronomical figure is 635,013,599,900.  Because of this factor there is no such  thing as 100 percent accuracy in bidding.  Two partners of expert ability are doing well if they bid and get a contract which  appears make able when the dummy hand is exposed.  But the contract in question may stand up or fall on the way the opponent’s twenty-six cards (half the deck) are divided.  Let’s take a simple example: Player A and B are partners, and they bid four hearts on cards they hold.  The dummy is exposed and it seems certain that the contract will be made if one particular opponent holds  the jack of trump; but A and B will be  set one trick if the other opponent holds that jack of hearts.  The above is true of most hands with exception of a lay down  hand.  no one can predict with certainty how many tricks he can win because the declarer cannot know the exact distribution  of cards held by the opposing team.  All that is expected of any good bridge player is to make the bid which has the highest expectation.  Following is a list of tables that will help improve your bridge playing:

            Possible Point  Counts.  Almost all bridge writers agree that the point-count bidding method has improved the bidding accuracy of the average bridge player.  The total number of high-card  points in a thirteen-card hand is 37 (out of a possible 40).  The following table gives the chance of being dealt any exact number of points from 0 to 37.  The chances are expressed in terms of percentages.  In other words, the number of times in 100 dealt hands you can expect to hold a specific  number of points.

Total Number of Points Counts

Expected  Appearance in 100 Deals

Total Number of Point Counts

Expected Appearance in 100 Deals.

0

0.364

19

1.036

1

0.788

20

0.643

2

1356

21

6.378

3

2.462

22

0.210

4

3.846

23

0.112

5

5.186

24

0.056

6

6.554

25

0.026

7

8.028

26

0.012

8

8.892

27

0.005

9

9.356

28

0.002

10

9.405

29

0.0007

11

8.945

30

0.0002

12

8.027

31

0.0001

13

6.914

32

    0.000017

14

5.693

33

      0.0000035

15

4.424

34

         0.00000077

16

3.311

35

           0.000000099

17

2.362

36

             0.0000000023

18

1.605

37

               0.00000000015

Possible Suit Splits Held by Opponents.

            The table depicts the percentage probability of finding all possible splits of cards held by the both opponents.  The number in the left-hand column is the combined total of cards held  by both opponents in the suit in question.  The numbers in the center column depict all possible split poker card hand held by the opponents.  The percentage figures shown in the right-hand  column is the chance possibility of each suit split.  These values are shown in terms  of percentages; in other words, the number of times in 100 dealt hands you can expect your opponents to hold the suit split in question

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AMERICAN WHIST =================

AMERICAN WHIST
BID WHIST
VINT
BOSTON
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Pinochle Many Variations
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Pinochle Many Variations
Two-Handed Pinochle
Two-Handed Doubling Redoubling
Auction pinochle
Strategy at Auction
CAD found
Partnership Auction
Auction pinochle without wido Individual play
Partnership Aeroplane Pinochle
Radio Partnership Pinochle

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Other Members of the Bezique Family

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The Bezique Family
Rubicon bezique
Two-handed sixty-six
Two-handed piquet
Imperial
Jass
Boo-Ray or BOURÉ

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The Big Euchre Family
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The big euchre family
Strategy of euchre
Auction euchre
Table of scoring points
Napoleon
Spoil five
Double hasenpfeffer
Ecarte
Three-card loo
Schafkopf

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The Heart Group
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Heart Group
Spot Hearts
Black Widow Hearts

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The All-Fours Group
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All-Fours Group
Shasta Sam
Auction Pitch Joker
Razzle-Dazzle

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Banking Card Games
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Banking Card Games
Black Jack, Casino Style
Black Jack Strategy
Pontoon
CHEMIN DE FER
CHEMIN DE PER must play
Baccarat Banque
Faro or farobank
ZIGINETTE
CHINESE FAN-TAN
Banker and broker
Red Dogs


Card craps
Lottery
TRENTE ET QUARANTE

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The Stops Games
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Stops Game
SNIP-SNAP-;SNOREM
ENFLE
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
Alternate Skarney
Skarney Singles
SKARNEY GIN ®
Skarney Gin Doubles

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Cheating at Card Games
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Cheating at Card Games
Professional Card Cheats
Nullifying the Cut
The Peek
How to Shuffle Cards

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Dice and their Many Games
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Dice and their Many Games
The Casino Game: Bank Craps
THE CASINO’S LPERCENTAGE OF BANK CRAPS BETS
SCARNE’S RULES FOR OTHER DICE GAMES
English Hazard
Hooligan
General
Double Cameroon
Partnership Straight scarney Dice
Scarney Duplicate Jackpots
Scarney Chemin de Fer

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Games Requiring Special Equipment
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Backgammon
Parcheesi
Hasami Shogi
Scarney
Follow The Arrow
Roulette

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Lottery and Guessing Games
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Lottery guessing game
Tossing Game
Race Horse Keno
Moko
The Match Game

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Glossary of Game Terms
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glossary
glossary1
glossary2
glossary3

 

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